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Weld Mold News and Announcements


Weld Mold Exhibits at Forge Fair 2017

All FORGE FAIR 2017 events held at the Greater Cleveland, OH Convention Center, which is located in the middle of a vibrant city. The area is alive with cultural activities, arts, sports and entertainment – all within walking distance. This striking, modern facility has become one of North America’s most popular sites for local, state, regional and national groups and organizations.


Making "Cents" Out of Welding Die Blocks

From the August 2015 issue of Forge Magazine / By David Lee, Weld Mold Company

The global economy isn’t coming; it’s already here! The competition is fierce, and every dime shaved from the cost of production can provide a competitive edge. Die welding is one way to cut costs from your production process.


Fixing Welding Gun Problems in the Forge

From the February 2015 issue of Forge Magazine / By David Lee, Weld Mold Company .... (pdf)


Fixing Welding Gun Problems in the Forge From the February 2015 issue of Forge Magazine / By David Lee, Weld Mold Company Virtually every forge has an arc-welding machine on hand. This article is a guide to keeping your MIG gun from turning a good day into a bad one.


2016 - NEW WELD MOLD 5551 FLUX CORED WIRE WITHSTANDS 1200°F HEAT WHILE MAINTAINING SUPERIOR HARDNESS

Brighton, MI… New Weld Mold® 5551 flux cored wire withstands extreme heat conditions for extreme welding applications by maintaining superior hardness retention in temperatures as high as 1200°F, while costing about 50% less than commonly used cobalt materials. Plus, testing proves that the hardness capabilities of formula 5551 continue to improve as the temperature increases.

Weld Mold 5551 is well suited for extreme welding applications because of its higher physical properties, its performance ability to excel in higher temperatures, and because it costs about 50% less than comparable cobalt materials. Formula 5551 is highly resistant to heat checking in environments where coolants are used, extremely abrasion resistant and tolerant of compressive loads. In addition, with a 30% higher deposition rating than typical flux cored wire, formula 5551 offers high weldability for general welding applications.

Weld Mold 5551 performs extremely well in areas where there are prolonged high temperatures. Extrusion dies also benefit from its higher wear capabilities.

The Weld Mold Company manufactures specialty high-alloy welding electrodes, cored wire and solid wire products that range from NiCrMo and high-chrome hotwork alloys to high-nickel and cobalt alloys to chrome carbide and chrome manganese alloys.

Weld Mold is an internationally recognized manufacturer that delivers high-quality custom solutions for general welding applications and for the forge welding. The company has offices in Brighton, Michigan, as well as in China and Korea.

For more information about new Weld Mold 5551, contact Sales at Weld Mold Company/ 750 Rickett Road, Brighton, MI 48116 USA USA/Phone: 1-810-229-9521/ Fax: 1-810-229-9580 Email: sales@weldmold.com


2015 - WELD MOLD ISSUES CUSTOM ALLOY CHALLENGE

Brighton, MI… To celebrate their 70th Anniversary while addressing a major industry shortcoming, Darryl S. Hammock, Weld Mold President, recently issued a welding industry custom alloy challenge.

“If your company routinely welds specialty metals together using standard electrodes and flux-cored alloys, don’t accept weld quality performance that is anything less than special. Instead, challenge Weld Mold to develop a performance-matched custom solution that fits your weld application exactly. Then compare. If you’re not satisfied with the results and weld quality difference, our specialty electrode and custom alloy will not cost your company a cent.”

“At Weld Mold, our R&D Metallurgical Department is capable of rapidly developing specialty electrodes and flux-cored alloys to suit almost any customer requirement and meet almost any AWS welding specification. It’s the reason our company has been able to develop and maintain over 3,000 performance-matched high-quality custom alloy solutions over the years. We’ve made it easy for welders to better solve almost any problem, and in many cases, save companies money as well. It’s one of the reasons Weld Mold has become the welders’ one-stop go-to shop.” The Weld Mold Company manufactures specialty high-alloy welding electrodes, cored wire and solid wire products that range from NiCrMo and high-chrome hotwork alloys to high-nickel and cobalt alloys to chrome carbide and chrome manganese alloys.

Weld Mold is an internationally recognized manufacturer that delivers high-quality custom solutions for general welding applications and for the forge welding. The company has offices in Brighton, Michigan, as well as in in China and Korea.

For more information about new Weld Mold 5551, contact Sales at Weld Mold Company/ 750 Rickett Road, Brighton, MI 48116 USA USA/Phone: 1-810-229-9521/ Fax: 1-810-229-9580 Email: sales@weldmold.com


Weld Mold Exhibits at Forge Fair 2015 - April 2, 2015

FORGE FAIR 2015 is next in a series of technology trade shows and symposium programs sponsored biannually by Forging Industry Association since 1970. The program has been carefully developed and planned to provide important networking opportunities between forgers and vendors…opportunities closer than generally available at any other forging industry program.

Visit Weld Mold Company at Booth #411 April 14th – 16th | Cleveland Convention Center

All FORGE FAIR 2015 events will be held at the Greater Cleveland, OH Convention Center, which is located in the middle of a vibrant city. The area is alive with cultural activities, arts, sports and entertainment – all within walking distance. This striking, modern facility has become one of North America’s most popular sites for local, state, regional and national groups and organizations.


How-to Welding Class: Gas Welding Session One - The Right Equipment - December 16, 2013 / 4WD Mechanix&cop;Moses Ludel

Gas welding is the foundation for all forms of welding. In this how-to, Gas Welding: Session One, our focus is equipment. The discussion includes equipment you will need for oxygen-acetylene welding, brazing and cutting.


Die and Equipmwnt Welding in the Forge - From the April 2010 issue of Forge Mazazine / By Darryl Hammock, Weld Mold Company

Damaged forging machinery or dies don’t always require an investment in new equipment. Weld Mold offers the options of flood welding to repair and refurbish dies, rams and other parts necessary to the forging industry.

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Die and Equipment Welding in the Forge, From the July 2008 issue of Forge Magazine / By David Fox, Weld Mold Company

Dies and the forging equipment in which they are installed undergo significant mechanical and thermal stresses as they cycle in and out of production runs. Unless dies are properly heated, aligned, stress-relieved and lubricated, they could fail catastrophically. This results in expensive downtime and lost production and costs more than a properly regulated maintenance program.

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Welded Repairs Extend Forging Die Life, From the April 2007 issue of Forge Mazazine / By Darryl Hammock, Weld Mold Company

Most forging die failures are caused by wear or cracks along edges and corners as a result of extreme and severe thermal stress. Specialized welding techniques, such as flood welding and overlay welding, can be used to repair and refurbish dies, often at minimal cost and substantial improvement in overall die life.

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Cast Iron Repair Welding Techniques, Don’t Toss Old Parts–Fix `Em! From the May, 2009 issue of Classic Trucks / By Moses Ludel

Classic truck restoration often means fixing old parts. Keeping the vehicle original or doing an actual “matching numbers” kind of buildup, there are times when you must restore an existing casting or metal part. Cast-iron repairs, including housings and engine blocks, generally fall into the last-resort category, as these repairs can prove costly and risky.

Iron is often less expensive to produce, yet it is durable, readily machinable, and can be reasonably strong. Not all iron is the same. Cast iron differs in carbon content, ductility, yield, and elongation. Alloyed irons resist wear, fatigue, and heat cycling.

Automotive applications of cast iron fall into several categories: 1) gray cast iron, used for engine blocks and gear housings; 2) alloy cast iron (with higher-tensile strengths), used for cast cylinders, pistons, rings, and brake drums; and 3) pearlitic malleable iron castings, which differ in stiffness for various applications. Malleable iron is common to axle and differential housings, camshafts, and even crankshafts.

Similarly, ductile cast iron (popularly called “nodular iron”) has strength and shock resistance. When we talk about a “nodular crankshaft” or Ford 9-inch “nodular” differential housing, these are high-tensile-strength yet ductile castings. Ductile iron means more elongation or “give” and less of a tendency to split or crack under high stresses. Since ductile iron can be flame or induction hardened, it is also popular for use with emission-era iron cylinder heads. Flame or induction hardening of exhaust valve seats allowed the use of unleaded fuels without the risk of rapid valve seat wear.


There are as Many Welding Techniques as Iron Types


Ask five specialists what makes the best cast-iron repair and you will likely get five answers! Repairing iron takes into account the ductility, composition, and granular structure of the base material. One type of casting may require a different welding technique or filler material than another. Of the irons, nodular types have a graphite and alloy content that is complex and not easy to duplicate during repairs. Gray iron, common to lighter-duty housings, requires preheat steps to prevent cracks during a repair. Malleable iron, such as that used in conventional crankshafts, is frequently welded in the automotive machine trade.

Since iron types have different metallurgy, any repair starts with identifying the iron involved. The kind of filler rod used in the welding process must be compatible with the iron. If not, even if the weld is successful, the weld area may not behave like the surrounding iron. One iron may be more ductile than another type–or the fill material may not behave properly. This can cause post-weld stress and cracks at the margins of the weld or “heat-affected zone” (HAZ).

A large problem when repairing cast iron is expansion and shrinkage. In some cases, the casting must be heated entirely to a uniform, high temperature before welding. There are procedures that place a casting inside an actual furnace. The piece heats gradually to red hot, and the welder makes the repair through a door in the furnace! Furnace welding helps prevent weld area shrinkage that causes cracks.

The greatest challenge in an iron repair is cracking. Extreme care must be taken to prevent cracking. Preheating is a requirement or recommendation with most cast-iron repairs. Forms of preheating include local heat with a rosebud torch, electrical resistance through the entire piece, cooking in a charcoal oven, or searing in a gas-fired furnace.

Before considering a weld method, understand that there are also other means for repairing iron. In some cases, a fuming bronze (brazing) technique will bring a broken casting back into shape without the extreme heat of welding. This method is common in field repairs of crude iron pipe and fittings like those used in low-pressure agricultural irrigation. Bronze filler, used in an oxyacetylene brazing process, is available to higher-tensile strengths. This will work for iron repairs on parts not subject to high load stresses.

A technique often overlooked is the use of silver brazing. This is sometimes called “silver soldering”; however, the material and heat involved is truly brazing. High-tensile-strength silver brazing rod and thorough fluxing can produce excellent results on a cast-iron repair. Especially in the case of a properly cleaned and fluxed fissure crack, silver brazing may be just the right fix. Silver brazing is commonly used to join high-pressure steel and brass fittings.

Lastly, there is the technique of metal spray or powder welding. Here, a special oxyacetylene torch has a hopper onboard. The hopper carries a formulated metal powder. When the iron reaches the correct temperature, the welder injects powder into the mixing chamber of the torch. At the iron surface, a bond similar to brazing or surface alloying takes place. The filler material has characteristics like the base iron. Powder bonds and builds up like the casting itself–without risk of sloughing or separating at the joining point. Masters of this technique can build new ears on broken transmission or engine block flanges. The technique has gained popularity as a sensible repair for cracked cylinder heads. After machining, a powder metal spray repair is often untraceable.

The repair at hand is a power steering gear casting with hairline fatigue cracks. Welding will require careful preparation and the correct filler rod. The welding method is TIG (GTAW), and the welder of choice is an air-cooled machine, such as a Miller or HTP. Note the steps carefully, and decide whether your projects can benefit from cast-iron restoration!

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Cast Iron had Proven its Worth in Powertrain Components and Chassis Members, Fleetline Cast Iron Axle Restoration from the Oct / Nov 2009 issue of Oliver Heritage Magazine / By Moses Ludel

The populariry of postwar 77 and 88 models calls for a closer look at the row crop axle. Most of these row crop castings failed in service, and our project specimen proved no exception. Years ago, the iron center section had been repaired by brazing technique. This created an opportuniry to examine a vintage axle repair and the cause.

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